Year 13 students visit CERN

Year 13 students visited the CERN in early December 2018 – and were left ‘wondering the immeasurable’.

The CERN and the chair

I have been running in the dark and the chair almost just appears in front of me. I am captured by its size and struck by the loudness of its message. I walk around it; it has a broken leg. I observe it, the chair is tall but broken, strong but broken, proud but broken.

Across it, sits the remarkable building of the Palais des Nations; it is impossible not to feel a shiver when admiring the togetherness of the flags; 193 tall, strong and proud spikes crowned with colourful fabrics.  The neoclassical palace was built for the peaceful collaboration between nations and yet, the chair is the symbol of the dichotomy of the meaning of collaboration.

No ambiguities the day before when I had the joy of accompanying Year 13 students on their annual trip to the CERN. Built in 1954 to prevent the exodus of European scientists to America, it bears an acronym which has now become obsolete, the nucleus of the atom has been conquered for a while; now in the CERN, they make dark matter!

The students mingle to perfection with scientists and visitors. They explore, they listen they ask and they wonder.

The CERN is the largest laboratory in the world but above all, it is there where the words peaceful collaboration acquires its true meaning. The data from the experiments carried out at 100 m underground in the border between France and Switzerland is sent to over 600 universities and institutes around the world; this is the birth place of the www forged, precisely for the purpose of sharing and working together.

The by-products of research carried out by thousands of scientists results in formidable technological advances.  From medical technologies that saves lives (PET scam), to new ways of communication, meteorological progress, aerospace applications to name some.

I watch the forever young year 13s as they look at the symbols written on the ‘wondering the immeasurable’ ribbons. They cheer every time they spot a formula they recognize from their physics lessons and then I am sure; one day with the advances from the Cern, all the year 13’s of the Kingsburies of the world working together will fix the chair.

Text and photos by Maria Gonzales – Physics Teacher

Engineers who ‘Walk-the-Talk!’

On Monday 21st January 2019, Chemical engineer, Nkechi Anasoh and Chartered Civil Engineer, Navdeep Dhillon spoke about engineering, STEM subjects and the exciting prospects ahead for students!

To build interest within Engineering and create industry links, Mr Ejaz invited two Engineers from industry to give a 1-hour lecture on their personal experience, from studying one of the Design & Technology subjects towards their current vocation, as esteemed professionals.

The dual objectives of the lecture were to provide an invaluable insight into the world of work, and to support students in thinking about the skills and strengths they are developing across their KS4 choices and how they connect to a career in Engineering. The session focused most explicitly on the transferable skills students can develop from both the subjects they are studying at Key Stage 4, and their option choices. Both Engineers provided invaluable insight and explained in depth how their own skills and experiences are connected to what they have done at school.

Nkechi Emmanuella Anasoh is a Chemical Engineer who has a BSc in Chemical Engineering and an MSc in Petroleum Engineering. She has been working within industry for the past 5 years and is currently working with Shell. Navdeep Dhillon is a Chartered Civil Engineer and has a Bsc in Civil Engineering. She has been working within industry for the past 28 years working for KD, Amey, Bam, Abbey Pynford Foundation Solutions and is currently a Senior Engineer within Morgan Sindall. She has worked on many prestigious project including: M&S Fenchurch Street, Royal Albert Hall, Natural History Museum Darwin Centre Beckton and The Leadenhall Building to name a few.

Mr Ejaz would like to thank Nkechi, Navdeep, Erik and all the students in Year 10 that participated within the lecture, they truly represented the ethos of Kingsbury High School.

Year 10 Motivational Workshops

future_first_alumni_sessions_year_10-3

During March and April, a group of Year 10 students participated in three motivational workshops to raise their confidence; provide them with a connection between their studies and the world of work; and to get them to think about their future career paths.

At each of the workshops, organised by Future First, four former Kingsbury High School students were invited back to school as role models.

The first session aimed to increase students’ knowledge about the various jobs that exist; expose them to different career pathways; and motivate them to think about the right career for them.

Working in small groups, students rotated round a bank of tables where alumni volunteers were stationed. Students were able to find out information about their working lives and how they got there.

Louis Cheshire left Kingsbury High School in 2007 and currently works as a Support Worker and a Freelance Photographer. Louis attended the first session and said “When I was that age I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do after education. When I thought about getting a good job, I always imagined that it came down to getting high grades in school and moving forward in a very rigid, linear fashion. I found that a very daunting prospect. What I wanted to convey to the students is that there isn’t one universally ‘right’ way to do things – that there are countless ways of getting to the place in life you want to be. Sometimes you have to take a chance and try something new – it doesn’t always work out the way you imagined it would – but as long as you learn from the experience and better yourself for it, it should never be considered a mistake. The students seemed pretty perceptive of that. I saw some keen minds in that workshop and with the support and guidance of the school and Future First I’m sure they will achieve great things.”

Following on from Louis’ thoughts, in the second session, students heard from alumni volunteers about how both good and bad grades can impact on future education and employment opportunities. They also found out which skills, gained from subjects studied at school, the volunteers use most in their jobs. Volunteers then helped students identify how their subject and extra-curricular interests can be applied to different jobs.

The third session saw alumni volunteers act as coaches and helped students to create their own ‘Picture of Me’ guiding them into thinking more laterally about their talents and achievements. The activity culminated in a conversation about future career options based on the students’ strengths and skills.

Shazma Roshan also left Kingsbury High School in 2007 and now works at KPMG as Audit Assistant Manager. Shazma attended the final session and said “I thought the session was really well done and interesting for the students because it was so interactive. Students responded well, some were initially slightly less communicative, but by the end of a conversation, they really got talking and it was very interesting to hear about their worries, their hopes and their dreams. It was very enjoyable and I really hope they’ve taken something from it!”

On behalf of Kingsbury High School and Future First, we would like to thank the alumni volunteers for giving up their time to assist in these workshops.